These 5 foods show how coronavirus has disrupted supply chains

Even as demand soars at grocery stores and food banks, farmers are forced to dump milk and let vegetables rot. Here's why.

Mass euthanasia of livestock, millions of gallons of dumped milk, piles of fresh vegetables left to rot in the sun: Images of farmers dumping their products stand in stark contrast to those showing mile-long lines for food banks. Over 36 million Americans are now unemployed, and food insecurity—which affected one in six Americans before COVID-19—will likely increase. Yet farmers say getting food into the hands of those who need it most is exceptionally difficult and often beyond their control.

The American Farm Bureau Federation estimates that only about eight percent of farms in the United States supply food locally. The rest feed a complex network that ensures restaurants and grocery stores across the country have a steady

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