Huge Turtle Was Titanoboa’s Neighbor

The Age of Dinosaurs ended about 66 million years ago. Granted, avian dinosaurs are still fluttering about, but all the fantastic non-avian forms – the sauropods, tyrannosaurs, ankylosaurs, ceratopsids, and kin – disappeared forever in one of the worst natural calamities of all time. They are never coming back.

All the same, early 20th century paleontologist William Diller Matthew once wondered if there might be another reptilian reign at some point in the distant future. In Matthew’s day, the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs were thought to be generalized little reptiles that “were probably much like the modern lizards in size, appearance, and habitat.” (This was decades before dinosauriforms such as Silesaurus and archaic dinosaurs like

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