‘Hydroxychloroquine tea’ is being peddled as a coronavirus cure in Brazil. It's fake.

Though there’s no proof that hydroxychloroquine fights COVID-19, an Amazon tree is being tapped for its supposed remedy. That may be unsafe.

Cinchona succirubra, a variety of quina tree also known as Cinchona pubescens, on a government plantation in Sikkim, India, 1866. Cinchona trees are native to South America but were transferred to plantations in India, after Europeans colonists learned that its plant extracts could fight malaria.
Photograph by Royal Geographical Society via Getty Images

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