Bizarre 12-Ton Dinosaur Crouched Like a Cat

"This was the animal that wanted to have everything."

Some 200 million years ago in what's now South Africa, a dinosaur that weighed as much as two adult African elephants loomed over the landscape. This massive herbivore got so big in a peculiar way—and it had a downright bizarre way of standing on all fours.

The new dinosaur, unveiled in Current Biology on Thursday, looks like a sauropod, the group of classic long-necked dinosaurs that includes Brontosaurus, but it's technically not. Instead, Ledumahadi is an earlier, more distant cousin called a sauropodomorph. It is a much bigger animal living much earlier in the age of dinosaurs than researchers normally expect to see, so its discoverers etched their surprise into the dinosaur's name: Ledumahadi mafube, Southern Sotho for

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