a microscope view of a filter with fibres and debris collected of a sea ice core.

Why does the Arctic have more plastic than most places on Earth?

Plastics travel on ocean currents and through the air to the far north and accumulate—sometimes inside the animals that live there.

Tiny fibers and debris collected during a sampling of a Greenland sea ice core are illuminated under a microscope in the lab of the research vessel Kronprins Haakon.

Photograph by Lawrence Hislop
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