The Arctic’s “Edmontosaurus” Gets a New Name

Dinosaurs lived all over the world during their Mesozoic heyday. Maps in books and documentaries drove the point home to me during my childhood dinomania, dots scattered across the globe showing all the places where the great reptiles had been found. But, no doubt influenced by Fantasia and the “monkey puzzles and parking lots” style of paleo art, I envisioned all those little specks as steaming swamps or lush floodplains in an endless dinosaurian summer. The thought of dinosaurs striding through the snow didn’t occur to me at all.

Bones excavated from Alaska’s extension into the Arctic Circle have changed that. Fossils from the 71-68 million year old stone of the Price Creek Formation have revealed a dinosaurian fauna that lived

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