The Guardian of the Genome [Science Tattoo]

Jacylnn, a medical student, writes: “If you assign a certain color to each base, this double helix tattoo represents the first 45 nucleic acids from the first exon of p53.  p53 is a transcription factor known as the “guardian of the genome.” It sends damaged cells into apoptosis and thus helps prevent cancer.  I studied p53 and other targets of the SV40 tumor virus while working on a molecular biology degree at The University of Pittsburgh.  I’m now a medical student at Nova Southeastern University.  My husband, who is much more right-brained than I am, designed the tattoo for me.”

[Update: Thanks to eagle-eyed readers who realized that the original photo was backwards. Fortunately, the error was photographic and not a matter for laser tattoo removal.]

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