<p><br> My name is <a href="https://twitter.com/sharkspacific" target="_blank">Jess Cramp</a> and I feel immensely grateful to live this wildly adventurous and fulfilling life. I’m a National Geographic emerging explorer, a shark researcher, marine conservationist, Ph.D. student, surfer, diver, writer, and professional gypsy. I live and work in the South Pacific, where the rich blue-violet of the deep ocean is as enchanting as the swaying palm trees of the islands themselves. Most of the year, I call the tiny volcanic island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands my home. I was involved in the establishment of a shark sanctuary in the Cooks three years ago, and now I’m studying the movement patterns of sharks and whether or not current laws and policies sufficiently protect them. When I am not working with local communities, traditional leaders, or government officials on marine issues, I can be found riding my motor scooter in search of fresh coconuts, practicing my ukulele, or exploring the reef both above and below the sea. But even more than warm, clear water, I appreciate the hospitality and incredible sense of humor of the people of this island who have graciously accepted me. For that reason alone, I encourage everyone to visit!</p>

I Am Jessica Cramp


My name is Jess Cramp and I feel immensely grateful to live this wildly adventurous and fulfilling life. I’m a National Geographic emerging explorer, a shark researcher, marine conservationist, Ph.D. student, surfer, diver, writer, and professional gypsy. I live and work in the South Pacific, where the rich blue-violet of the deep ocean is as enchanting as the swaying palm trees of the islands themselves. Most of the year, I call the tiny volcanic island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands my home. I was involved in the establishment of a shark sanctuary in the Cooks three years ago, and now I’m studying the movement patterns of sharks and whether or not current laws and policies sufficiently protect them. When I am not working with local communities, traditional leaders, or government officials on marine issues, I can be found riding my motor scooter in search of fresh coconuts, practicing my ukulele, or exploring the reef both above and below the sea. But even more than warm, clear water, I appreciate the hospitality and incredible sense of humor of the people of this island who have graciously accepted me. For that reason alone, I encourage everyone to visit!

Photograph by Tina Weier

An Explorer's Guide to Rarotonga

National Geographic Explorer Jessica Cramp shares insider tips for traveling in Rarotonga.

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