Canada's greatest natural wonders, from icebergs to the world's highest tides

Icebergs, waterfalls, the world's highest tides — here’s what not to miss.

This article was produced by National Geographic Traveller (UK).

Bay of Fundy

Between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, the Bay of Fundy hosts the world’s highest tides. Hikers have almost 30 trails to explore, while kayakers can explore the sandstone Hopewell Rocks formations and adrenaline junkies can go mud sliding or raft the 13ft-high waves in a Zodiac.

How to do it: Tidal Bore Rafting Resort arranges rafting tours. 

Iceberg Alley

Every spring, the Arctic releases as many as 800 icebergs that sail along a watery highway, nicknamed Iceberg Alley, which stretches from Labrador to Newfoundland. These white to gas-flame blue ice chunks are so plentiful local distilleries use them to make vodka. Take a boat tour to see them up close.

How to do it: Iceberg Alley Boat Tours depart from St Lunaire. 

Red-Sand Beaches

There are 500 miles of red beaches on Prince Edward Island. Turned crimson by the iron found in the sandstone cliffs, these photogenic sweeps make for an unforgettable stroll. Favourites are Cavendish Beach, near where Anne of Green Gables author LM Montgomery grew up, and the deep red Argyle Shore.

How to do it: Red Sand Tour & Taxi offers guided trips to the beaches. 

Niagara Falls

The three waterfalls that make up Niagara pour out around a million bathtubs of water every minute. This wonder of the world straddles the US-Canadian border, and has been drawing travellers for centuries. 

How to do it: The Falls can be seen for free from Table Rock Centre; or book Journey Behind the Falls, to access observation decks behind the cascades. 

Aurora Borealis

Streaking across the night sky, the Northern Lights are one of nature’s best shows. This ethereal phenomenon is notoriously elusive, but your chances of seeing them improve the closer you are to the Arctic Circle. Some of the best are seen in Churchill, Manitoba — where they appear, on average, 300 nights a year. 

How to do it: Churchill’s research station provides guided tours. 

Published in the June 2023 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK).

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