<p><br> In 2002 Queen Paola commissioned Jan Fabre, an edgy Antwerp artist, to transform the ceiling of the Royal Palace’s Hall of Mirrors. The shimmering result: a swirling galaxy of iridescent green patterns made from the discarded wing cases of a million-plus Thai jewel beetles.</p>

Brussels, Belgium


In 2002 Queen Paola commissioned Jan Fabre, an edgy Antwerp artist, to transform the ceiling of the Royal Palace’s Hall of Mirrors. The shimmering result: a swirling galaxy of iridescent green patterns made from the discarded wing cases of a million-plus Thai jewel beetles.

Photograph by Dirk Pauwels, Angelos

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