Dallas Must-Dos

Our experts recommend the top attractions in and around Dallas—with advice on how to get the most out of your visit.

Barry Whistler Gallery

“Recently renovated sparse space with consistently inspired installations.” —Allison V Smith. Barry Whistler represents established and emerging contemporary Texas artists. 2909-B Canton St. tel. +1 214 939 0242. www.barrywhistlergallery.com

Nasher Sculpture Center

“Explore Mr. Nasher’s stunning private collection in the peaceful sculpture garden in the heart of the city and enjoy lunch indoors or out.”—Allison V. Smith. A grand green space offers a “roofless museum,” where you can wander around to see one of the more magnificent collections of twentieth-century sculpture anywhere. 2001 Flora St. tel. +1 214 242 5100; fee. www.nashersculpturecenter.org

The Dallas Arboretum

“This is the city’s prettiest public setting, overlooking bucolic White Rock Lake.”—Mariana Greene, Home and Garden editor, Dallas Morning News. Vast gardens include a fern dell, hardy palms, natives, water-wise landscaping choices, and an expansive trial garden; walk, jog, or cycle around the adjacent lake. 8525 Garland Rd. tel. +1 214 515 6500; fee. www.dallasarboretum.org

Victory Park

“An example of the pure renaissance that has happened downtown, moving northward toward Uptown in a place that was just a brown field.”—Brian Sweany. Home to American Airlines Center (where the Dallas Mavericks play basketball and the Dallas Stars play hockey) and a vibrant urban collection of restaurants, hotels, shopping, dining, and nightlife spots. 2400 Victory Park Ln. www.victorypark.com

The Meadows Museum

“Home to the largest collection of Spanish art in the States.”—Eric Celeste. A hidden gem at Southern Methodist University. 5900 Bishop Blvd. tel. +1 214 768 2516; fee. www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org

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Search Trips

Dealey Plaza and the Sixth Floor Museum

Visiting Dallas means noting the tragedy of November 22, 1963. Stroll the green area at Dealey Plaza where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated; tour the museum in the Texas School Book Depository building, where assassin Lee Harvey Oswald took aim. Exhibits include a minute-by-minute account of events on the infamous day; more than 400 photographs, video footage, and an audio tour. 411 Elm St. tel. +1 214 747 6660 or 888 485 4854; fee. www.jfk.org

Dallas World Aquarium

Old West End Historic District warehouse building now blends miracles of the ocean with wonders of a rain forest. Step inside the Orinoco River region of the Amazon, where toucans fly free and monkeys swing through the trees; also crocodiles, spiders, vampire bats, sharks, stingrays, leafy sea dragons, jellyfish, penguins, and a giant Pacific octopus. 1801 North Griffin St. tel. +1 214 720 2224; fee. www.dwazoo.com

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