<p class="p1">My name is <a href="https://twitter.com/krithikaranth" target="_blank">Dr. Krithi K. Karanth</a> and I live in Bangalore, <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/india-guide/" target="_blank">India</a>. My research in India has spanned 17 years and encompasses a broad range of issues examining human dimensions of wildlife conservation in seven states across India, with a particular focus on the Western Ghats.</p> <p class="p1">I have conducted research on mammal extinctions, the impacts of wildlife tourism in reserves, socio-ecological consequences of voluntary resettlement, and, more recently, on understanding human-wildlife conflicts and assessing biodiversity outside parks. My projects have trained over 500 citizen scientists in field methods across more than 25 research and conservation projects.</p> <p class="p1">I have published over 65 articles and blog posts, including several for National Geographic. I was honored to be National Geographic Society's 10,000th grantee in 2011 and was selected as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2012. I have a Ph.D. in environmental science and policy from Duke University, a master's in environmental science from Yale University, and B.S. and B.A. degrees from the University of Florida.</p>

I Am Krithi Karanth

My name is Dr. Krithi K. Karanth and I live in Bangalore, India. My research in India has spanned 17 years and encompasses a broad range of issues examining human dimensions of wildlife conservation in seven states across India, with a particular focus on the Western Ghats.

I have conducted research on mammal extinctions, the impacts of wildlife tourism in reserves, socio-ecological consequences of voluntary resettlement, and, more recently, on understanding human-wildlife conflicts and assessing biodiversity outside parks. My projects have trained over 500 citizen scientists in field methods across more than 25 research and conservation projects.

I have published over 65 articles and blog posts, including several for National Geographic. I was honored to be National Geographic Society's 10,000th grantee in 2011 and was selected as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2012. I have a Ph.D. in environmental science and policy from Duke University, a master's in environmental science from Yale University, and B.S. and B.A. degrees from the University of Florida.

Photograph by Sandesh Kadur, National Geographic

An Explorer's Guide to India

National Geographic Explorer Krithi Karanth shares insider tips for traveling in India.

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