Stretching for five miles along Havana's coastline, the Malecón esplanade separates Cuba's capital from the crashing surf of the Caribbean Sea. Every evening, the Malecón becomes a major gathering place (Photo by Andrew Evans, National Geographic Travel).
Stretching for five miles along Havana's coastline, the Malecón esplanade separates Cuba's capital from the crashing surf of the Caribbean Sea. Every evening, the Malecón becomes a major gathering place (Photo by Andrew Evans, National Geographic Travel).

Photo Gallery: Havana

This National Geographic Expeditions Cuba Trip has offered a spectacular opportunity to meet Cubans on their home turf and share with them our own impressions of their country. Though we explored several other areas in Cuba, we began and ended our expedition in the capital, Havana. With 2.2 million inhabitants, it’s impossible to caption this diverse and colorful city, but this handful of photos offers a little peek at the beauty of Havana and those who live there.

This trip is one of the many ways to travel with National Geographic Expeditions. To learn more about all of our travel programs, click here.

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