A New Prospect for New Orleans

When it comes to New Orleans, world-class live music and sinfully delicious meals often steal the spotlight. This month, however, visual arts are taking center stage.

Prospect.1, a brand new biennial contemporary art event in New Orleans, kicked off on November 1st and will continue through January 18, 2009.

Artists from around the world, including German artist Katharina Grosse, Iranian artist Shirin Neshat, and New Orleans native Willie Birch, will be displaying their work throughout the city. The art – murals, installations and everything in between – will be displayed in galleries as well as in less traditional locations (read: empty lots in the Lower Ninth Ward).

Aside from being cheap (just pick up a free ticket at select locations) and an easy way to see innovative works from across the globe, Prospect.1 is a great opportunity for art lovers to help bolster a recovering cultural scene in New Orleans.

The Prospect.1 website says it best:

“For every night you stay in a hotel, every meal you eat, and every musician you hear performing in a local club, you contribute directly to the rebuilding of New Orleans.”

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Read More about Prospect.1 in the City Life section of the November/December Issue of Traveler.

Image: One of the artworks in Prospect.1 as featured in Traveler’s current issue.

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