Tour Guide: Saving Animals in Africa

When traveling to environmentally fragile places, one can’t help but feel a bit conflicted. But here are some Africa tours that will give you a lot to see, without leaving a big footprint (or giving you a headache).

Terra Incognita Ecotours provides direct financial benefits for conservation and empowerment for local people. For every participant traveling on the “Gorillas in the Mist” tour in Rwanda, Terra Incognita donates to the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project. They are also partners with the African Conservation Foundation and the Jane Goodall Institute. Other Terra Incognita tours include Costa Rica (in partnership with the Costa Rican Conservation Foundation), Nicaragua, and Borneo (with Red Ape Encounters and Adventures).

The 61,800-acre (25,000 hectare) Shamwari Game Reserve

has its own wildlife department, breeding center, and anti-poaching unit, and its wildlife director (Johan Joubert) was voted one of South Africa’s Top Ten Conservationists by the Endangered Wildlife Trust.

Since 1991, Shamwari has bred more than 5,000 head of game, rehabilitated and reseeded overgrazed land, and created 14 separate farms. Check out Ker & Downey for information about tours to Shamwari.

Image: Terra Incognita Ecotours

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