<p><br> Walking a slackline can be hard enough. For pioneering rock climber Dean Potter, one of our 2009 <a href="http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/adventurers-of-the-year/dean-potter-2009/">Adventurers of the Year</a>, walking a highline, untethered, at 10,000-plus-feet-high on Cathedral Peak in Yosemite, California, is just another day of his truly incredible way of life.</p>

Highlining at Cathedral Peak, Yosemite, California


Walking a slackline can be hard enough. For pioneering rock climber Dean Potter, one of our 2009 Adventurers of the Year, walking a highline, untethered, at 10,000-plus-feet-high on Cathedral Peak in Yosemite, California, is just another day of his truly incredible way of life.

Photograph by Mikey Schaefer

Dean Potter - Human Flight Photo Gallery

Legendary free-solo climber Dean Potter wants to fly. See photos of his free soloing, wing suit flying, highlining and more.

Read This Next

What drives elephant poaching? It’s not greed
How old are you, really? The answer is written on your face.
The rise of vegan safaris

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet