<p>One of 17 new species of <a id="wcqu" title="fish" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/">fish</a> discovered in central Borneo, the 1.5-inch-long (3.6-centimeter-long) eight-banded barb can be found in shady <a id="ljmw" title="rain forest" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/rainforest-profile.html">rain forest</a> streams and swamps.</p><p>More than 120 new species—including the world's longest <a id="o.78" title="insect" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/bugs/">insect</a>, a "ninja" slug, and a lungless frog—have been found in Borneo since 2007, according to a new report released on <a id="anr4" title="Earth Day" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/earth-day/">Earth Day</a> by the international conservation group <a id="mtaa" title="WWF" href="http://www.wwf.org/">WWF</a>. The world's third largest island, <a id="pvjn" title="Borneo (map)" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=2.2625953010152324, 115.19165039062501&amp;z=5">Borneo (map)</a> is divided among <a id="kqx4" title="Malaysia" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/malaysia-guide/">Malaysia</a>, <a id="oxwy" title="Indonesia" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/indonesia-guide/">Indonesia</a>, and <a id="zav3" title="Brunei" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/brunei-guide/">Brunei</a>.</p><p>"On average, there are three new species found every month," said ecologist <a id="o.:o" title="Adam Tomasek" href="http://www.panda.org/who_we_are/wwf_offices/singapore/?187822/Adam-Tomasek-Leader-of-the-Heart-of-Borneo-in-Singapore">Adam Tomasek</a>, leader of WWF's team for the 54-million-acre (22-million-hectare) Heart of Borneo region. "What's really compelling is the diversity of these species."</p><p>(See <a id="laig" title="pictures of Borneo forests" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/borneo/klum-photography">pictures of Borneo forests</a> in <em>National Geographic </em>magazine.)</p><p>—<em>Carolyn Barry in Sydney</em></p>

New Borneo Fish

One of 17 new species of fish discovered in central Borneo, the 1.5-inch-long (3.6-centimeter-long) eight-banded barb can be found in shady rain forest streams and swamps.

More than 120 new species—including the world's longest insect, a "ninja" slug, and a lungless frog—have been found in Borneo since 2007, according to a new report released on Earth Day by the international conservation group WWF. The world's third largest island, Borneo (map) is divided among Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei.

"On average, there are three new species found every month," said ecologist Adam Tomasek, leader of WWF's team for the 54-million-acre (22-million-hectare) Heart of Borneo region. "What's really compelling is the diversity of these species."

(See pictures of Borneo forests in National Geographic magazine.)

Carolyn Barry in Sydney

Photograph courtesy C.K. Yeo

Photos: "Ninja" Slug, Longest Insect Among New Species

In time for the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, a new report spotlights new species from Borneo, including a flying frog and the world's longest insect.

Read This Next

The science behind seasonal depression
These 3,000-year-old relics were torched and buried—but why?
How the Holocaust happened in plain sight

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet