<p><strong>Scientists unearth an Ice Age bison skull near Snowmass Village, <a id="y7.j" title="Colorado" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/united-states/colorado-guide/">Colorado</a>, on November 6.</strong></p><p>"I'm trying to think of a cooler fossil that I've even seen in my life," dig team member <a id="mcvw" title="Kirk Johnson" href="http://www.dmns.org/about-us/executive-profiles/kirk-johnson">Kirk Johnson</a>, chief curator at the Denver Museum of Nature &amp; Science, said in a statement.</p><p>The bison skull is part of a "bumper crop" of Ice Age animals recently discovered at the site, including American mastodons, Columbian mammoths, tiger salamanders, and a Jefferson's ground sloth—the first ever found in Colorado, according to the Denver museum. Construction workers stumbled upon the Ice Age treasure trove in October while working on a reservoir-expansion project.</p><p>While winter weather has put a hold on excavations at the site, scientists are analyzing many of the 600 fossils found so far—thought to date to at least 130,000 years ago—at the Denver museum's laboratory. (See <a id="aa4q" title="&quot;Comet &quot;Shower&quot; Killed Ice Age Mammals?&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/100407-ice-age-extinction-comet-meteor-shower/">"Comet "Shower" Killed Ice Age Mammals?"</a>)</p><p>Team member <a id="zomm" title="Scott Elias" href="http://www.gg.rhul.ac.uk/elias/">Scott Elias</a>, a paleoecologist at Royal Holloway, University of London, also announced in January that he has extracted beetles and other insects from peat samples taken from the site.</p>

"Cool" Ice Age Skull

Scientists unearth an Ice Age bison skull near Snowmass Village, Colorado, on November 6.

"I'm trying to think of a cooler fossil that I've even seen in my life," dig team member Kirk Johnson, chief curator at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, said in a statement.

The bison skull is part of a "bumper crop" of Ice Age animals recently discovered at the site, including American mastodons, Columbian mammoths, tiger salamanders, and a Jefferson's ground sloth—the first ever found in Colorado, according to the Denver museum. Construction workers stumbled upon the Ice Age treasure trove in October while working on a reservoir-expansion project.

While winter weather has put a hold on excavations at the site, scientists are analyzing many of the 600 fossils found so far—thought to date to at least 130,000 years ago—at the Denver museum's laboratory. (See "Comet "Shower" Killed Ice Age Mammals?")

Team member Scott Elias, a paleoecologist at Royal Holloway, University of London, also announced in January that he has extracted beetles and other insects from peat samples taken from the site.

Photograph courtesy Heather Rousseau, Denver Museum of Nature & Science

Pictures: "Remarkable" Ice Age Fossil Cache Found

The "bumper crop" of prehistoric animals—including mammoths and a giant sloth—is giving scientists a peek into Ice Age life in the Rockies.

Read This Next

Clothing from 1600s shipwreck shows how the 1 percent lived
A Q&A with Nikole Hannah-Jones on ‘The 1619 Project’

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet