Watch the Frolicking Panda Clip That Lit Up 'Snowzilla'

Footage of giant panda Tian Tian enjoying the mega-snowstorm at Washington's National Zoo went viral Saturday.

Abundant snow is fostering an abundance of cuteness at the Smithsonian National Zoo, where giant panda Tian Tian thoroughly relished the newly fallen powder.

A clip of the 18-year-old male basking in the Washington, D.C. snow went viral on Saturday as a massive blizzard swept through the U.S. Northeast. The video racked up 43 million views within 24 hours of being posted on the zoo's Facebook page.

The storm, dubbed Snowzilla by The Washington Post and Winter Storm Jonas by the Weather Channel, dumped more than three feet of snow in some places.

A video from last year showing Tian Tian's 16-month-old cub, Bao Bao, tumbling down a snow-covered slope also drew a lot of fans.

"This is [giant pandas'] favorite time of year," National Zoo senior scientist Don Moore said after the Bao Bao clip got attention. "They've got a big fat layer, a big, hairy coat—they're adapted to this kind of weather condition." Read more about how zoos plan for weather.

If you can't get enough adorable, check out this photo gallery with 15 shots of cute, cuddly animals playing in the snow.

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