The fight to protect the world’s most trafficked wild commodity

Chinese demand for rosewood—trafficked more than ivory, rhino horn, and pangolin scales—is fueling a crisis in Guatemala's forests.

Durable, fragrant rosewood, used to make furniture and musical instruments, is the world’s most trafficked wild product by value and volume.
Photograph by Carlos Duarte

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