Amazing Footage: Giant Spider Carrying a Dead Mouse

Just in time for Halloween, video has emerged from Australia that may chill your blood.

Facebook user Jason Womal uploaded video of a giant spider dragging a mouse.

"So I am just about to leave for work about 0030 [12:30 am] and me neighbour says, 'You want to see something cool,'" Womal wrote. "So we proceed to his place and he shows me this. Huntsman trying to eat a mouse."

Australia has 94 known species of Huntsman spiders. They are "famed as being the hairy so-called 'tarantulas' on house walls that terrify people by scuttling out from behind curtains," writes the Australian Museum.

The large, hairy spiders are mostly gray or brown, though some have banding on their legs. They range in size from less than an inch to nearly six inches across.

Huntsman spiders are not considered dangerous to people, although large ones can inflict painful bites. Normally they are wary of people but can bite if push comes to shove. If bitten, experts recommend reducing inflammation with an ice pack.

The spiders are frequently found under loose bark and in crevices and they often enter homes and vehicles. (Learn about the hundreds of mouse-sized spiders released in the U.K.)

Huntsman spiders most often eat insects and other spiders, though they are known to occasionally take bigger prey, such as mice.

Female huntsman spiders lay up to 200 eggs in flat, papery sacs made of silk. The mother stands guard over her brood, without eating, for up to three weeks. During this time the mother can be quite aggressive, and will often rear up in a threatening display if disturbed.

In some species, the mother will carry the egg sac under her body. Once the spiderlings hatch, the mother will often stay with them for several weeks. The spiders moult in order to grow larger in size.

The spiders are thought to live around two years.

Australia is known for its many spiders, including a mysterious one with blood red fangs that was found last year and the millions of spiders that occasionally cover towns with silk. Warmer weather has even seemed to result in more of the creatures appearing there recently.

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