Hippos, hyenas, and other animals are contracting COVID-19

More species are found to be susceptible to the coronavirus, with most cases detected in zoos.

Ngozi and Kibo, ages 22 and 23, developed a cough, lethargy, and runny noses at home in Colorado in November. Soon it was determined that their run-of-the-mill symptoms were signs of a global first: These Denver Zoo residents became the first hyenas in the world known to be infected with COVID-19.

The milestone, nearly 20 months into the pandemic, is part of a pattern in recent months. On October 6, a binturong (“bearcat”) and a fishing cat tested positive at Chicago Zoo, followed a week later by a coati. Two hippos at a zoo in Belgium fell victim on December 5. All were the first of their species to contract the virus.

They’re now part of a group

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