Giant Sunken Island Revealed off Scotland

Prehistoric "Atlantis" found a mile deep—complete with peaks and riverbeds.

(Also see "'Atlantis' Eruption Twice as Big as Previously Believed, Study Suggests.")

A few hundred miles west of Scotland's Orkney archipelago (map), the newfound island sank about 56 million years ago. It was first spotted in the early 2000s via reflection seismology data—a sonar-like technology—from oil-prospecting ships.

Scientists recently returned to the site to conduct a more detailed mapping study. Their results reveal that the drowned island once occupied an area of nearly 4,000 square miles (10,000 square kilometers)—which would have made it a little bigger than Puerto Rico (map).

(Related: "Alexander the Great Captured City via Sunken Sandbar.")

The unique profile of one of the rivers imaged during the survey—which meandered more than 62 miles (100 kilometers)

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