San Francisco's Bay Bridge Becomes Public Art

Light artist Leo Villareal transforms the Bay Bridge with 25,000 points of light.

This public art installation will shine from dusk until 2 a.m. each evening with patterns of light that never repeat, thanks to a computer program created by artist Leo Villareal.

This program, based on software used by graphic artists to simulate rain or snow for movies and games, allows Villareal to flick points of light on and off according to a specific set of rules that he determines.

"You have thousands and thousands of points and they all have simple rules [to follow] and somehow, something complex emerges," Villareal said. "That's really the art."

In the simulated world contained in his computer, Villareal can manipulate parameters including how fast a particle can go, whether they can speed up or slow down, and

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