One seat, multiple representatives? A novel political idea takes off in Brazil.

Marginalized people are banding together to run for a single office. It’s not entirely legal but ‘it’s what people want.’

Paula Nunes, speaking to the crowd at a São Paulo protest, belongs to one of the growing number of political collectives in Brazil. Political collectives put one member’s name on the ballot but campaign—and serve their constituents—as a group.

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