Kids suffer most in one of Earth's most polluted cities

In winter, coal stoves and power plants choke Mongolia's capital, Ulaanbaatar, with smoke—and lung disease.

A two-year-old girl is treated for pneumonia in the intensive care unit of an Ulaanbaatar hospital. On her forehead is a smudge of coal ash applied by her mother to ward off evil spirits. It's air pollution from coal burning, however, that has caused the incidence of pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses to spike in the Mongolian capital, especially among children.

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