<p><strong>Rodnell Collins, Malcolm X's nephew, and <a href="http://www.historicboston.org/">Historic Boston, Inc</a>.'s Kathy Kottaridis gaze at the boarded-up Malcolm X-Ella Little-Collins House in <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/boston-massachusetts/">Boston</a>, where the famous civil rights activist grew up. </strong></p><p>Due to its dilapidated state, the historically significant building has been placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's 2012 list of <a href="http://www.preservationnation.org/issues/11-most-endangered/">America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places</a>.</p><p>Now in its 25th year, the annual list highlights examples of U.S. architectural, cultural, and natural heritage at risk of destruction or irreparable damage. (See <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/06/pictures/110623-americas-11-most-endangered-historic-places-nation/">pictures of 2011's most endangered sites</a>.)</p><p>"This year's list reflects the diversity of America, its historic places, and the variety of threats they face," <a href="http://www.preservationnation.org/about-us/team/stephanie-meeks/stephanie-meeks-bio.html">Stephanie Meeks</a>, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, said in a statement.</p><p>"As it has over the past 25 years, we hope this year's list inspires people to speak out for the important places in their own communities that help to define our nation's past-and enrich its future."</p><p>Built in 1874, the Boston abode is Malcolm X's last known surviving boyhood home. He shared the house with his half-sister, Ella Little-Collins, whose son, Rodnell Collins, is the current owner.</p><p>The house has been largely vacant for more than 30 years, but Collins and Historic Boston hope to raise $750,000 to transform it into living quarters for graduate students studying African American history, social justice, or civil rights.</p><p><em>—Ker Than</em></p>

Malcolm X-Ella Little-Collins House, Boston

Rodnell Collins, Malcolm X's nephew, and Historic Boston, Inc.'s Kathy Kottaridis gaze at the boarded-up Malcolm X-Ella Little-Collins House in Boston, where the famous civil rights activist grew up.

Due to its dilapidated state, the historically significant building has been placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's 2012 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

Now in its 25th year, the annual list highlights examples of U.S. architectural, cultural, and natural heritage at risk of destruction or irreparable damage. (See pictures of 2011's most endangered sites.)

"This year's list reflects the diversity of America, its historic places, and the variety of threats they face," Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, said in a statement.

"As it has over the past 25 years, we hope this year's list inspires people to speak out for the important places in their own communities that help to define our nation's past-and enrich its future."

Built in 1874, the Boston abode is Malcolm X's last known surviving boyhood home. He shared the house with his half-sister, Ella Little-Collins, whose son, Rodnell Collins, is the current owner.

The house has been largely vacant for more than 30 years, but Collins and Historic Boston hope to raise $750,000 to transform it into living quarters for graduate students studying African American history, social justice, or civil rights.

—Ker Than

Photograph by Barry Chin, Boston Globe/Getty Images

Pictures: 11 Most Endangered U.S. Historic Sites Named

On the 25th anniversary of the preservation ranking, see which U.S. places are most in danger-plus a success story and a lost landmark.

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