Picturesque California conceals a crisis of missing Indigenous women

Indigenous families are demanding justice for crimes they say stem from centuries of oppression.

Christina Lastra holds a portrait of her mother, Alicia Lara, at her home in Eureka, California. In 1991, Lara was found dead in the passenger seat of her car in Weitchpec—one of thousands of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Despite an autopsy report indicating she'd been murdered, Lara's death was ruled an accident. “No justice was ever done," says Lastra.

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