The ancient monastic community of Mount Athos in northern Greece still beckons men who seek to satisfy a spiritual hunger. Picking persimmons at dusk, an Eastern Orthodox Christian monk lives much as his brethren did a thousand years ago.
The ancient monastic community of Mount Athos in northern Greece still beckons men who seek to satisfy a spiritual hunger. Picking persimmons at dusk, an Eastern Orthodox Christian monk lives much as his brethren did a thousand years ago.

Called to the Holy Mountain

The Monks of Mount Athos

The holy peninsula of Mount Athos reaches 31 miles out into the Aegean Sea like an appendage struggling to dislocate itself from the secular corpus of northeastern Greece. For the past thousand years or so, a community of Eastern Orthodox monks has dwelled here, purposefully removed from everything except God. They live only to become one with Jesus Christ. Their enclave—crashing waves, dense chestnut forests, the specter of snowy-veined Mount Athos, 6,670 feet high—is the very essence of isolation.

Living in one of the peninsula's 20 monasteries, dozen cloisters, or hundreds of cells, the monks are detached even from each other, reserving most of their time for prayer and solitude. In their heavy beards and black garb—worn to signify their death to the world—the monks seem to recede into a Byzantine fresco, an ageless brotherhood of ritual, acute simplicity, and constant worship, but also imperfection. There is an awareness, as one elder puts it, that "even on Mount Athos we are humans walking every day on the razor's edge."

They are men—exclusively. According to rigidly enforced custom, women have been forbidden to visit Mount Athos since its earliest days—a position born out of weakness rather than spite. As one monk says, "If women were to come here, two-thirds of us would go off with them and get married."

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