Are Humans Pushing the Slow Loris to Extinction?

A surge in interest in the wide-eyed creature has fueled a pet trade.

After videos of slow lorises being tickled and fed rice balls in captivity swept the Internet, the wide-eyed animals shot to viral fame. The YouTube videos generated thousands of comments about the primate’s adorable looks, but they also highlighted a grievous threat facing slow lorises: demand for them as pets.

All species of slow lorises are supposed to be protected by local laws in southern Asia and by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), a treaty that aims to prevent trade that could threaten wild species’ survival. Still, countless slow lorises are captured each year from their rain forest habitat and sold online, across borders, or to local wildlife markets.

Customers find them irresistible, but these primates don’t fare well as pets. Before they’re sold, most undergo a painful process to remove their sharp teeth—and circumstances don’t improve from there. In a 2016 study, researchers from Oxford Brookes University examined a hundred online videos of pet lorises and concluded that all the animals were distressed, sick, or exposed to unnatural conditions. “They’re quite sensitive,” says Christine Rattel of International Animal Rescue, which runs a slow loris rescue program in Indonesia. “They are nocturnal, small animals that don’t like to be handled.”

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