The Placenta May Hold Clues to a Deadly Pregnancy Illness

Immunologist Suchita Nadkarni studies mouse placentas to better understand the dangerous pregnancy condition known as preeclampsia.

Every day hundreds of women die in pregnancy or childbirth. This statistic, which the World Health Organization deems “unacceptably high,” reflects problems in all nations, however prosperous. In the U.S., pregnancy-related deaths have risen steeply in the last two decades.

A primary culprit is a cardiovascular complication called preeclampsia. Marked by high blood pressure, swelling, and elevated protein in the mother’s urine, preeclampsia can be treated but still accounts for many maternal deaths each year—and usually results in premature birth. Worldwide it’s a leading cause of mother and fetal mortality, says Suchita Nadkarni, an immunologist at Queen Mary University of London. Her research aims to find early markers for the illness, which to date is only identifiable in the second or third trimester.

To work toward earlier detection, Nadkarni studies the placenta. The organ grows in a gestating mammal’s uterus to nourish a fetus—but can do that properly only if the immune system is working. When Nadkarni altered that system in mice, vital blood vessels (visible as red on the edges of the five slices on the right half of the image above) became abnormal (four slices on the left).

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