Yusufu Shabani Difika lost his arms in a lion attack in Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve. Poor villagers farm marginal land along reserve edges, where bushpigs raid crops and lions may attack people. Here his uncle bathes Difika, a father of two.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.brentstirton.com/">www.brentstirton.com</a>
Yusufu Shabani Difika lost his arms in a lion attack in Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve. Poor villagers farm marginal land along reserve edges, where bushpigs raid crops and lions may attack people. Here his uncle bathes Difika, a father of two.

www.brentstirton.com

Living With Lions

When people and lions collide, both suffer.

Lions are complicated creatures, magnificent at a distance yet fearsomely inconvenient to the rural peoples whose fate is to live among them. They are lords of the wild savanna but inimical to pastoralism and incompatible with farming. So it’s no wonder their fortunes have trended downward for as long as human civilization has been trending up.

There’s evidence across at least three continents of the lions’ glory days and their decline. Chauvet Cave, in southern France, filled with vivid Paleolithic paintings of wildlife, shows us that lions inhabited Europe along with humans 30 millennia ago; the Book of Daniel suggests that lions lurked at the outskirts of Babylon in the sixth century B.C.; and there are reports of lions surviving in Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran until well into the 19th or 20th centuries. Africa alone, during this long ebb, remained the reliable heartland.

But that has changed too. New surveys and estimates suggest that the lion has disappeared from about 80 percent of its African range. No one knows how many lions survive today in Africa—as many as 35,000?—because wild lions are difficult to count. Experts agree, though, that just within recent decades the overall total has declined significantly. The causes are multiple—including habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching of lion prey for bush meat, poachers’ snares that catch lions instead, displacement of lion prey by livestock, disease, spearing or poisoning of lions in retaliation for livestock losses and attacks upon humans, ritual killing of lions (notably within the Maasai tradition), and unsustainable trophy hunting for lions, chiefly by affluent Americans.

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