The Geyser’s Admired and Dependable—Much Like the Archivist

With a photo of Old Faithful, we mark the retirement of our In the Loupe feature, and of longtime photo archivist Bill Bonner.

The star of this 1919 photo—the ideal image to cap our coverage of the National Park Service’s centennial year—is Old Faithful. The geyser in Yellowstone National Park mesmerizes us today as it did these women nearly a century ago. While the pair appear to be viewing one of America’s best known landmarks at a precariously close range, they did remember to shield themselves from the sun—or perhaps a scalding mineral spray—with their elegant parasols.

Bill Bonner has brought a gift for unearthing just the right photo to In the Loupe and to countless other projects. During more than 33 years as the archivist of National Geographic’s vintage collection, Bonner—wearing his trademark white cotton gloves—lovingly tended a collection containing some eight million photographs.

This year he began his well-earned retirement. So after this issue we’re retiring In the Loupe as well.

Read This Next

Black homeownership thrives in this NYC neighborhood
COVID-19 is now the deadliest pandemic in U.S. history
Influx of Haitian migrants overwhelms Texas border authorities

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet