4 solutions for trees and forests threatened by a hotter world

Most important, of course, is to cut the emissions that are heating the planet. But beyond that, there are ways to help forests adapt.

Heat lamps glow in an infrared image of a research station near the University of Minnesota’s Cloquet Forestry Center. Scientists want to see how elevated temperatures and drought conditions in the future could affect the complicated forest ecosystem, from soil to treetops.
Photograph by David Guttenfelder

Climate change poses a profound new threat to forests around the world, as Craig Welch explains in detail elsewhere in this special issue of National Geographic. Deforestation is an older and even larger threat. There is nothing more important that humans can do for forests, which have been on this planet for hundreds of millions of years, than cut our greenhouse gas emissions and stop cutting down old-growth trees.

But climate change won’t be stopped for decades at best, and trees and forests are already confronting it. Scientists are working on solutions to help them adapt. Here we look at four of them.

By Alejandra Borunda

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