Why our commitment to sound science is more vital than ever

The pandemic has sown confusion for readers struggling to make sense of it all. We’re redoubling our efforts to bring you fact-based reporting.

We published the first issue of National Geographic in October 1888. The magazine looked quite different from today’s, with a plain brown cover and not a single photograph in its 98 pages.

Clearly, a lot has changed. But two things have remained constant: We have always covered science, and we’ve always covered the environment. “Geographic Methods in Geologic Investigation” is one headline from that first issue. “The Great Storm of March 11-14, 1888” is another.

Today we’re still covering storms, especially as they grow fiercer with climate change. And we’re still covering groundbreaking science—perhaps now more than ever, as we document the coronavirus that has swept across the Earth since the start of the year.

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