Photographer Erika Larsen on Yellowstone

A onetime Fulbright fellow uses photography to connect people and the landscape.

From the Sami herders in Scandinavia to Garrison Keillor in Minnesota, Erika Larsen’s photography projects often take her to places “where the landscape is extremely important to people.” Even so, the onetime Fulbright fellow says she was amazed by the hold that Yellowstone has on residents and visitors alike.

Larsen met Native American archaeologists who felt “tangible moments” of connection with ancestors from centuries ago. She met ranchers who were overcome with emotion when they spoke of passing on their land to future generations. She met travelers from all over the world making a once-in-a-lifetime journey.

Larsen also met park rangers who’d worked elsewhere before. Yellowstone was their last stop, they told her. “Why would you leave?”

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