Photographer Joe Riis on Yellowstone

A wildlife biologist turned photographer follows daunting animal migrations across Yellowstone's expansive landscapes.

Joe Riis is one of six photographers who contributed to  National Geographic magazine's special issue on Yellowstone. Learn about the other five at  natgeo.com/yellowstone.

The first migration that Joe Riis studied in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem was of pronghorn. Next the wildlife biologist turned photographer followed a 150-mile mule deer migration. Then Riis and ecologist Arthur Middleton spent two years documenting elk migrations, for which they were named National Geographic’s 2016 Adventurers of the Year.

By photographing “all the animals that need the freedom to roam,” Riis says, “I wish to show what is at stake.” He hopes his work encourages “a new understanding and appreciation of our first national park.”

See more from Joe Riis on Instagram and his website

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