<p>From their vantage point high above Earth, astronauts on the <a href="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/space-exploration/international-space-station-article/">International Space Station</a> were able to capture daybreak (left) and nighttime auroras in a single frame.</p><p>The newly released picture, snapped on March 6 over the Indian Ocean, also shows a Russian Soyuz spacecraft (center) and a Progress resupply ship docked at the station.</p>

Southern Sky Show

From their vantage point high above Earth, astronauts on the International Space Station were able to capture daybreak (left) and nighttime auroras in a single frame.

The newly released picture, snapped on March 6 over the Indian Ocean, also shows a Russian Soyuz spacecraft (center) and a Progress resupply ship docked at the station.

Photograph courtesy NASA

Space Pictures This Week: Aurora Bubble, Martian Veins, More

Northern lights shine over Sweden, minerals crisscross Mars, a robotic astronaut gets tested, and more in the week's best space pictures.

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