Can You Spot All the Moons in This Picture?

NASA is playing a game of Where's Waldo with an image from the Cassini spacecraft.

Here you can see two of Saturn's moons, Enceladus and Rhea, above and below the planet's rings, respectively. But what about a third moon, Atlas? 

Atlas is a mere 19 miles (30 km) across, compared to Enceladus, which is 313 miles (504 km), and Rhea, 949 miles (1,527 km).

Still don't see Atlas? Here's another hint: It's to the left and slightly up from Rhea, hidden in the gap between rings, appearing as a much smaller dot.

You can see more on the NASA website.

<p>To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Hubble snapped this shot of the Gum 29 nebula and Westerlund 2, a ruby-colored cluster of about 3,000 stars. The two-million-year-old cluster houses some of the Milky Way’s hottest, brightest stars.</p>

Cosmic Fireworks

To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Hubble snapped this shot of the Gum 29 nebula and Westerlund 2, a ruby-colored cluster of about 3,000 stars. The two-million-year-old cluster houses some of the Milky Way’s hottest, brightest stars.

Photograph by NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team

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