Photo of the Day: Best of August

Every day, we feature an image chosen from thousands around National Geographic. Here are some highlights from August.

A windy boat ride in Maine, a stand of snow-dusted aspen trees in New Mexico, the muscular curve of a crocodile’s tail thrashing through the water, firecrackers painting a summer night. These are some of my favorite images from last month’s Photo of the Day. And while these photographs were taken at all different parts of the year, there is something about the mix of movement and calm, of vibrant color and monochrome, that speaks about transitions—from celebration to reflection, from movement to stillness, from summer to fall.

Photographer Michael Melford captured breathtaking landscapes for the the September 2014 National Geographic story, “50 Years of Wilderness.” What I like most about this frame of snow-covered aspens near

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