<p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Even—or perhaps especially—from a vast distance, the scale of destruction and despair in the capital, Port-au-Prince, after the <a id="pheq" title="Haiti" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/haiti-guide/">Haiti</a>&nbsp;<a id="vahy" title="earthquake" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/earthquake-profile.html">earthquake</a> is graphically clear (<a id="utpq" title="Haiti map" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/haiti-map/">Haiti map</a>).</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Seen via satellite on the morning of Wednesday, January 13, 2010, earthquake victims—dead and alive—crowd streets and Stade Sylvio Cator (right), home to Haiti's national soccer team. (Read <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100113-haiti-earthquake-red-cross/">"Haiti Earthquake 'Strange,' Strongest in 200 Years."</a>)</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Wary of the Caribbean city's weakened buildings, many survivors remain outdoors day and night and are erecting makeshift tent cities in the stadium and elsewhere throughout the Haitian capital.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Two days after the Tuesday-evening, magnitude 7 earthquake, the death toll in Haiti continues to swell. "Our organization thinks between 45,000 and 50,000 people have died," Victor Jackson, assistant national coordinator with the Haitian Red Cross, told the Reuters news agency.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">(Also see: <a id="ww6j" title="&quot;Haiti Earthquake Pictures: Devastation on the Day After.&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/photogalleries/100113-haiti-earthquake-pictures/#025609_600x450.jpg">"Haiti Earthquake Pictures: Devastation on the Day After."</a>)</p>

Earthquake Victims Take to Stadium

Even—or perhaps especially—from a vast distance, the scale of destruction and despair in the capital, Port-au-Prince, after the Haiti earthquake is graphically clear (Haiti map).

Seen via satellite on the morning of Wednesday, January 13, 2010, earthquake victims—dead and alive—crowd streets and Stade Sylvio Cator (right), home to Haiti's national soccer team. (Read "Haiti Earthquake 'Strange,' Strongest in 200 Years.")

Wary of the Caribbean city's weakened buildings, many survivors remain outdoors day and night and are erecting makeshift tent cities in the stadium and elsewhere throughout the Haitian capital.

Two days after the Tuesday-evening, magnitude 7 earthquake, the death toll in Haiti continues to swell. "Our organization thinks between 45,000 and 50,000 people have died," Victor Jackson, assistant national coordinator with the Haitian Red Cross, told the Reuters news agency.

(Also see: "Haiti Earthquake Pictures: Devastation on the Day After.")

Satellite photograph courtesy GeoEye

Haiti Earthquake Pictures: Aerial Views of the Damage

Even--or perhaps especially--from a distance, the scale of destruction and despair after the Haiti earthquake is graphically clear.

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