<p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Hidden miles beneath the surface of an ice sheet (shown in blue), the so-called ghost peaks in the middle of <a id="fk6s" title="Antarctica" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/places/continents/continent_antarctica.html">Antarctica</a> are finally coming into view, researchers announced last month.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">Ground-penetrating radar results from 2008 and 2009 have made possible the most detailed images yet (such as the one above) of the Gamburtsev Mountains—and it's a surprisingly serrated range, the experts say.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">The radar-based images reveal a slightly exaggerated view of the jagged, roughly 8,500-foot-tall (2,600-meter-tall) peaks. The range likely formed millions of years before becoming covered in Antarctic ice, said geophysicist Robin Bell of Columbia University's <a id="b5-d" title="Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory" href="http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/">Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory</a>, who led <a id="g62y" title="America's Gamburtsev Province Project" href="http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/gambit/">America's Gamburtsev Province Project</a> as part of the <a id="jsrm" title="International Polar Year (2007-08)" href="http://www.ipy.org/about-ipy">International Polar Year (2007-08)</a> science program.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">In size and shape, Bell said, the Gamburtsevs resemble the United States' Cascade Range, home of <a id="xavu" title="Mount Rainier (picture)" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/national-parks/mount-rainier-national-park/">Mount Rainier (picture)</a>.</p><p style="margin: 5pt 0pt;">(Also see: <a id="rx.3" title="&quot;Mystery Deepens Over Unseen Antarctic &amp;squot;Alps.&amp;squot;&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/11/081106-antarctica-mountains.html">"Mystery Deepens Over Unseen Antarctic 'Alps.'"</a>)</p><p><em>—Richard A. Lovett</em></p>

Ghost Peaks Emerge

Hidden miles beneath the surface of an ice sheet (shown in blue), the so-called ghost peaks in the middle of Antarctica are finally coming into view, researchers announced last month.

Ground-penetrating radar results from 2008 and 2009 have made possible the most detailed images yet (such as the one above) of the Gamburtsev Mountains—and it's a surprisingly serrated range, the experts say.

The radar-based images reveal a slightly exaggerated view of the jagged, roughly 8,500-foot-tall (2,600-meter-tall) peaks. The range likely formed millions of years before becoming covered in Antarctic ice, said geophysicist Robin Bell of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who led America's Gamburtsev Province Project as part of the International Polar Year (2007-08) science program.

In size and shape, Bell said, the Gamburtsevs resemble the United States' Cascade Range, home of Mount Rainier (picture).

(Also see: "Mystery Deepens Over Unseen Antarctic 'Alps.'")

—Richard A. Lovett

Illustration courtesy Michael Studinger

First Detailed Pictures: Antarctica's "Ghost Mountains"

Hidden under miles of ice, a mountain range in the middle of Antarctica is finally coming into view–thanks to radar data revealing a surprisingly spiky underworld.

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