<p>Fibers cradle a planet-like ball in an award-winning image meant to convey that Earth's future is in our collective hands.</p><p>Harvard University's <a id="nfyt" title="Sung Hoon Kang" href="http://www.seas.harvard.edu/directory/shkang">Sung Hoon Kang</a> submerged tiny plastic fibers—each only 1/500 as big as a human hair—in an evaporating liquid, where they spontaneously and cooperatively supported the small green ball.</p><p>"Using the image, I tried to describe cooperative efforts across the world to save our Earth by going green," Hoon said.</p><p>The shot was selected as best photograph in the 2009 <a id="jir6" title="International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge" href="http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/scivis/">International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge</a>. The annual contest, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the journal <em>Science</em>, award outstanding artistic efforts to visualize complex scientific concepts. (<a id="ra7o" title="See some of last year's winners." href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/09/photogalleries/2008-best-science-photos/">See some of last year's winners.</a>)</p><p>The winners will be announced in tomorrow's issue of <em><a id="s7es" title="Science" href="http://www.sciencemag.org/">Science</a></em>.</p><p><em>—Brian Handwerk</em></p>

First Place, Photography: "Save Our Earth, Let’s Go Green"

Fibers cradle a planet-like ball in an award-winning image meant to convey that Earth's future is in our collective hands.

Harvard University's Sung Hoon Kang submerged tiny plastic fibers—each only 1/500 as big as a human hair—in an evaporating liquid, where they spontaneously and cooperatively supported the small green ball.

"Using the image, I tried to describe cooperative efforts across the world to save our Earth by going green," Hoon said.

The shot was selected as best photograph in the 2009 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. The annual contest, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the journal Science, award outstanding artistic efforts to visualize complex scientific concepts. (See some of last year's winners.)

The winners will be announced in tomorrow's issue of Science.

—Brian Handwerk

Image courtesy Sung Hoon Kang, Boaz Pokroy, and Joanna Aizenberg, Harvard University

Best Science Pictures Announced

See some of 2009's most incredible science photos, illustrations, and installations—winners of the International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge.

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