<p><strong>Pictured in a January 7 satellite image—about a month before a massive collision—the <a id="ninu" title="Luxembourg" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/luxembourg-guide/">Luxembourg</a>-size iceberg B9B floats toward the hundred-mile-long (160-kilometer-long) floating "tongue" of <a id="tt8m" title="Antarctica" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/places/continents/continent_antarctica.html">Antarctica</a>’s Mertz Glacier. The tongue is already weakened by growing rifts on both sides of its midsection.</strong></p><p>The 60-mile-long (97-kilometer-long) B9B iceberg smashed into the Mertz Glacier Tongue on February 12 or 13—creating a second, 48-mile-long (78-kilometer-long) iceberg, according to a the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACECRC).</p><p>The two icebergs are now floating at sea, side by side, and debris from the breakup is filling the once clear waterway beside <a id="gt.b" title="Mertz Glacier (map)" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/map-machine#s=h&amp;c=-67.55048003134316, 144.7929000109434&amp;z=4">Mertz Glacier (map)</a>. Prior to the separation, iceberg B9B had spent nearly 20 years floating close to the glacier.</p><p>Some experts warn the newly floating ice could seriously impact ocean circulation—causing unknown consequences for Earth's climate and the region’s marine animals.</p><p>(Also see <a id="rb5." title="&quot;Manhattan-Size Ice Island Cracks in Half.&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/10/071003-ice-island.html">"Manhattan-Size Ice Island Cracks in Half."</a>)</p>

Giant Iceberg Headed for Trouble

Pictured in a January 7 satellite image—about a month before a massive collision—the Luxembourg-size iceberg B9B floats toward the hundred-mile-long (160-kilometer-long) floating "tongue" of Antarctica’s Mertz Glacier. The tongue is already weakened by growing rifts on both sides of its midsection.

The 60-mile-long (97-kilometer-long) B9B iceberg smashed into the Mertz Glacier Tongue on February 12 or 13—creating a second, 48-mile-long (78-kilometer-long) iceberg, according to a the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACECRC).

The two icebergs are now floating at sea, side by side, and debris from the breakup is filling the once clear waterway beside Mertz Glacier (map). Prior to the separation, iceberg B9B had spent nearly 20 years floating close to the glacier.

Some experts warn the newly floating ice could seriously impact ocean circulation—causing unknown consequences for Earth's climate and the region’s marine animals.

(Also see "Manhattan-Size Ice Island Cracks in Half.")

Photograph courtesy Neal Young, Commonwealth of Australia

Epic Iceberg Smashup Could Change Currents

A Luxembourg-size iceberg recently crashed into a glacier "tongue" in Antarctica, creating a second giant iceberg—which could spell double trouble for ocean currents and marine animals.

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