<p><strong>This unnamed new imperial pigeon is among a menagerie of new species discovered in <a id="x:od" title="Indonesia" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/indonesia-guide/">Indonesia</a>'s <a id="sh06" title="Foja Mountains (map)" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=-2.7510175647965727, 138.95782470703125&amp;z=8">Foja Mountains (map)</a></strong><strong>, scientists announced Monday.</strong></p><p>In a few short weeks in these pristine <a id="ibk6" title="rain forests" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/rainforest-profile.html">rain forests</a> on the island of New Guinea, an international survey team uncovered at least a dozen new <a id="fkxn" title="mammals" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/">mammals</a>, <a id="haea" title="reptiles" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/reptiles/">reptiles</a>, <a id="nrk1" title="amphibians" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/">amphibians</a>, <a id="ue52" title="insects" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/bugs/">insects</a>, and <a id="klf_" title="birds" href="http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/birds/">birds</a>—including a <a id="fkm4" title="Pinocchio" href="http://disney.go.com/vault/archives/characters/pinocchio/pinocchio.html">Pinocchio</a>-like frog and the world's smallest wallaby.</p><p>Many of the animals are found nowhere else but in the Foja mountaintops, whose inaccessibility has allowed the species to evolve in isolation—prompting the region's nickname: the Lost World.</p><p>In 2008 <a id="p-85" title="Conservation International" href="http://www.conservation.org/Pages/default.aspx">Conservation International</a>'s Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) helicoptered in and endured violent storms and flash floods to assess the region's "biological value."</p><p class="western">A follow-up to a <a id="cng3" title="2005 RAP, which brought the Lost World worldwide fame" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/02/0207_060207_new_species.html">2005 RAP, which brought the Lost World worldwide fame</a>, the 2008 expedition was partially funded by the National Geographic Society's <a id="u_4c" title="Expeditions Council" href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/field/grants-programs/expeditions-council.html">Expeditions Council</a>. (The National Geographic Society owns National Geographic News.)</p><p>(<a id="kqms" title="Pictures: &amp;squot;&amp;squot;Lost World&amp;squot;&amp;squot; of New Species Found in Indonesia&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/02/photogalleries/newguinea/index.html">Pictures: ''Lost World'' of New Species Found in Indonesia"</a> [2006].)</p><p><em>—Brian Handwerk</em></p>

New Species, "Lost World"

This unnamed new imperial pigeon is among a menagerie of new species discovered in Indonesia's Foja Mountains (map), scientists announced Monday.

In a few short weeks in these pristine rain forests on the island of New Guinea, an international survey team uncovered at least a dozen new mammals, reptiles, amphibians, insects, and birds—including a Pinocchio-like frog and the world's smallest wallaby.

Many of the animals are found nowhere else but in the Foja mountaintops, whose inaccessibility has allowed the species to evolve in isolation—prompting the region's nickname: the Lost World.

In 2008 Conservation International's Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) helicoptered in and endured violent storms and flash floods to assess the region's "biological value."

A follow-up to a 2005 RAP, which brought the Lost World worldwide fame, the 2008 expedition was partially funded by the National Geographic Society's Expeditions Council. (The National Geographic Society owns National Geographic News.)

(Pictures: ''Lost World'' of New Species Found in Indonesia" [2006].)

—Brian Handwerk

Photograph courtesy Neville Kemp

New Species Found in "Lost World": Pinocchio Frog, More

See the active-nosed "Pinocchio frog," the world's smallest wallaby, and other new species found in the tropical mountains called the Lost World.

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