<p><strong>Storm-tossed toys add to the dollhouse effect at the damaged <a href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=36.85056336223189, -75.97791217267512&amp;z=10">Virginia Beach (map)</a> home of Denise Robinson (left), seen cleaning up Sunday after <a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricane-profile/">Hurricane</a> Irene struck the city Saturday. Downgraded to a tropical storm Sunday morning, weakening Irene continued its march up the U.S. East Coast, to <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-york-new-york/">New York City</a> and beyond.</strong></p> <p>Even as clouds went from gray to white and sunshine again struck much of the coast Sunday, officials cautioned that the danger hadn't gone with the wind and rain. Flooding is seen as a major threat as Irene's storm surges swell inland waterways.</p> <p>"Our focus really is now on the next 72 hours," U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator <a href="http://www.fema.gov/about/bios/wfugate.shtm">Craig Fugate</a> said at a press conference Sunday. "We may not yet have all the impacts from the storm as rivers continue to come up."</p> <p><strong><a href="http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/26/send-your-huricane-video-to-national-geographic-television/">Share your Hurricane Irene video with the National Geographic Channel &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p><em>—National Geographic News staff, with reporting by Willie Drye</em></p>

After Irene

Storm-tossed toys add to the dollhouse effect at the damaged Virginia Beach (map) home of Denise Robinson (left), seen cleaning up Sunday after Hurricane Irene struck the city Saturday. Downgraded to a tropical storm Sunday morning, weakening Irene continued its march up the U.S. East Coast, to New York City and beyond.

Even as clouds went from gray to white and sunshine again struck much of the coast Sunday, officials cautioned that the danger hadn't gone with the wind and rain. Flooding is seen as a major threat as Irene's storm surges swell inland waterways.

"Our focus really is now on the next 72 hours," U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Craig Fugate said at a press conference Sunday. "We may not yet have all the impacts from the storm as rivers continue to come up."

Share your Hurricane Irene video with the National Geographic Channel >>

—National Geographic News staff, with reporting by Willie Drye

Photograph by Steve Helber, AP

Hurricane Irene Pictures: Floods, Damage in New York, Beyond

In the wake of Irene, New York, Virginia Beach, and other U.S. East Coast cities recover amid flooding and the debris of damaged homes.

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