<p><strong>Meet a new prince of the underworld—the <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/09/pictures/110909-demon-tube-nosed-bats-beelzebub-new-species/#/beelzebub-tube-nosed-bat_39928_600x450.jpg">Beelzebub bat</a>, one of the <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/10/101027-halloween-costumes-facts-history-nation-science/">Halloween</a>-worthy new species announced in 2011.</strong></p><p>Named for its diabolic coloration, the recently discovered bat has a black head and dark back fur, both of which contrast sharply with the flyer's whitish belly.</p><p>Despite the fiendish name, Beelzebub bats are typically shy creatures, doing their best to avoid humans in their remote<a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/rainforest-profile/"> rain forest</a> habitat in <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/vietnam-guide/">Vietnam</a>, scientists say.</p><p>If captured, however, the bats can turn fierce, said Neil Furey, a biologist with the conservation group<a href="http://www.fauna-flora.org/"> Fauna &amp; Flora International</a>.</p><p>"Once in the hand, they will do their best to escape," said Furey, co-author of a study released in September.</p><p>"In essence, they exhibit a 'flight' first and 'fight' second response—the latter only when they have no other option."</p><p>(See <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/10/photogalleries/scary-new-animals-halloween/">pictures of Halloween-worthy new species announced in 2009</a>.)</p><p><em>—By National Geographic News staff</em></p>

"Demon" Bat

Meet a new prince of the underworld—the Beelzebub bat, one of the Halloween-worthy new species announced in 2011.

Named for its diabolic coloration, the recently discovered bat has a black head and dark back fur, both of which contrast sharply with the flyer's whitish belly.

Despite the fiendish name, Beelzebub bats are typically shy creatures, doing their best to avoid humans in their remote rain forest habitat in Vietnam, scientists say.

If captured, however, the bats can turn fierce, said Neil Furey, a biologist with the conservation group Fauna & Flora International.

"Once in the hand, they will do their best to escape," said Furey, co-author of a study released in September.

"In essence, they exhibit a 'flight' first and 'fight' second response—the latter only when they have no other option."

(See pictures of Halloween-worthy new species announced in 2009.)

—By National Geographic News staff

Photograph courtesy Gabor Csorba, HNHM

Halloween Pictures: 9 Spooky New Species Found This Year

From a Beelzebub bat to a vampire flying frog-see Halloween-worthy species that crept from the shadows into the scientific limelight.

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