<p><strong>An unnamed new species of Yeti crab swarms near hot, mineral-rich hydrothermal vents in the <a href="http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/">oceans</a> off <a href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/antarctica/">Antarctica</a>—a newfound "lost world" of strange deep-sea species, scientists say.</strong></p><p>(See <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/03/0309_060309_yeti_crab.html">picture: ""Yeti Crab" Discovered in Deep Pacific."</a>)</p><p>A camera-equipped submersible robot filmed species such as barnacles, crabs, anemones, and even an octopus, all of which are mostly colorless and live in utter darkness at depths of 7,875 feet (2,400 meters), according to a new study.</p><p>About 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers) east of the southern tip of South America, "this is a new province of deep-sea life, something like a new continent, and it's a place we've been trying to [reach] for a long time," said study co-author Jon Copley, a marine biologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom.</p><p>"It harbors some of the lushest abundance of life I have ever seen in the deep ocean," he said.</p><p>(<a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/02/photogalleries/newguinea/index.html">Pictures: "Lost World" of new Species Found in Indonesia.</a>)</p><p>The species of Antarctica's "lost world" were described this week in the journal <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001234">PLoS Biology</a>.</p><p><em>—Dave Mosher</em></p>

"Lost World" Yeti Crab Swarm

An unnamed new species of Yeti crab swarms near hot, mineral-rich hydrothermal vents in the oceans off Antarctica—a newfound "lost world" of strange deep-sea species, scientists say.

(See picture: ""Yeti Crab" Discovered in Deep Pacific.")

A camera-equipped submersible robot filmed species such as barnacles, crabs, anemones, and even an octopus, all of which are mostly colorless and live in utter darkness at depths of 7,875 feet (2,400 meters), according to a new study.

About 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers) east of the southern tip of South America, "this is a new province of deep-sea life, something like a new continent, and it's a place we've been trying to [reach] for a long time," said study co-author Jon Copley, a marine biologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom.

"It harbors some of the lushest abundance of life I have ever seen in the deep ocean," he said.

(Pictures: "Lost World" of new Species Found in Indonesia.)

The species of Antarctica's "lost world" were described this week in the journal PLoS Biology.

—Dave Mosher

Photograph courtesy NERC CHESSO Consortium

"Lost World" of Odd Species Found Off Antarctica (Pictures)

Swarms of yeti crabs and a ghostly octopus are among the new species spotted near hydrothermal vents, a new study says.

Read This Next

Can science help personalize your diet?
Hogs are running wild in the U.S.—and spreading disease
Salman Rushdie on the timeless beauty of the Taj Mahal

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet