<p>Powder-splattered, and powder-splattering, runners cross the finish line of the <a href="http://thecolorrun.com/about/">Color Run</a> 5K in Irvine, California, on April 22. Each kilometer (0.6 mile) of the event features a color-pelting station dedicated to a single hue, culminating in the <a href="http://www.jacksonpollock.com/art.shtml">Pollock-esque </a>riot at Kilometer 5.</p> <p>The "magical color dust" is completely safe, organizers say, thought they admit it's "surprisingly high in calories and leaves a chalky aftertaste."<br><br><strong>Why We Love It </strong></p> <p>"Vibrant color floating through the air automatically brings to mind festive Holi celebrations in India. We expect to see revelers in Mumbai, but instead find a surprise in the lower third of the frame—runners in California!"<em>—Sarah Polger, senior photo editor</em></p> <p>"There are a lot of eye-catching <a href="http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-of-the-day/holi-celebrants-india/">photographs of the festival of Holi</a> in India that show colored powder in midair, but this particular situation has the people all lined up in a row—making it easy to see each of their very cinematic facial expressions."<em>—Chris Combs, news photo editor</em></p>

Saturation Point

Powder-splattered, and powder-splattering, runners cross the finish line of the Color Run 5K in Irvine, California, on April 22. Each kilometer (0.6 mile) of the event features a color-pelting station dedicated to a single hue, culminating in the Pollock-esque riot at Kilometer 5.

The "magical color dust" is completely safe, organizers say, thought they admit it's "surprisingly high in calories and leaves a chalky aftertaste."

Why We Love It

"Vibrant color floating through the air automatically brings to mind festive Holi celebrations in India. We expect to see revelers in Mumbai, but instead find a surprise in the lower third of the frame—runners in California!"—Sarah Polger, senior photo editor

"There are a lot of eye-catching photographs of the festival of Holi in India that show colored powder in midair, but this particular situation has the people all lined up in a row—making it easy to see each of their very cinematic facial expressions."—Chris Combs, news photo editor

Photograph by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/AP

Pictures We Love: Best of April

From hippo dental care to hammer time—see National Geographic photo editors' favorite news pictures from last month.

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