<p>As the distorted crescent moon sets near the horizon, the newly discovered comet PanSTARRS (upper left) makes its first appearance in the Northern Hemisphere on March 12, setting behind the William Herschel Telescope during a cloudy evening in La Palma, California.</p><p>The comet, which had grazed through the&nbsp;<a class="c11" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/03/pictures/1303012-comet-panstarrs-space-science/">sky in the Southern Hemisphere</a> for several months, is visible to the naked eye and is said to be brighter than any other comet seen in recent years.</p>

PanSTARRS’s Northern Debut

As the distorted crescent moon sets near the horizon, the newly discovered comet PanSTARRS (upper left) makes its first appearance in the Northern Hemisphere on March 12, setting behind the William Herschel Telescope during a cloudy evening in La Palma, California.

The comet, which had grazed through the sky in the Southern Hemisphere for several months, is visible to the naked eye and is said to be brighter than any other comet seen in recent years.

Photograph by Babak A. Tafreshi, TWAN

Space Pictures This Week: Airglow, Frozen Trees

Comet PanSTARRS debuted in the north, colorful airglow in the south, and a diminishing water reserve in the Middle East.

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